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Survey Results Fitting Room

In 2017 the Innofact Research Institute conducted a survey on behalf of Ansorg to evaluate fitting rooms and their effects on consumer behaviour. We based our development of a new fitting room concept and lighting system on the findings of this survey.

Here is a summary of the most important findings

  • 74.6% of the population often or always try on the garments they have selected in the store’s fitting room.
  • 40.2% sometimes leave the store without making a purchase because they don’t like the fitting room.
  • Although 92.3% of the population believe it is important or very important to try garments on in the fitting room to see whether they fit, 71.7% of them are frustrated by the poor fitting room conditions (too small, bad lighting, etc.).
  • 72.7% get annoyed or very annoyed about the poor quality of lighting in the fitting room – and 78.7% in the case of women.
  • Poor lighting is a factor that annoys customers more than having no back view mirror (66.4%), no chair/seat (63.5%) and no freedom of movement (62.6%).
  • 85% of all respondents stated that a pleasantly-lit, bright fitting room is important – and that sentiment is shared by more than 90% of women.
  • Generally, women attach more importance to good fitting room lighting than men. 
  • 36.7% of 30 to 39 year olds consider adjustable lighting (light scenarios) to be an important or very important way of checking how a garment looks for different occasions.
  • Trying on clothes in the fitting room is particularly important to men when trying on trousers, jeans and suits, and to women trying on trousers, jeans and dresses.

Which of the following consumer types are you when you shop for clothes in a store?

Four consumer types (A to D) were defined. Two of them (types A and B) are fitting room users who always or often try on garments before buying them. The two other types (types C and D) are spontaneous shoppers or people who know exactly what they want and take garments straight to the check-out without trying them on, although they do check their look and feel.

 

 

Three-quarters of the population often or always try on selected garments in store fitting rooms. 41.4% (type A) always try on garments that interest them. 33.2% of respondents (type B) often try on one or several garments in the fitting room before buying them. Only one-quarter of the population (types C + D) tend not to use a fitting room because they know their size so well that trying a garment on isn't important to them. These consumer types simply look for size, colour, material and quality of workmanship.

 

Which fashion products do you think should definitely be tried on in a fitting room? (Select up to five products.)

The respondents could select up to five of the following product categories: trousers, jeans/shorts, jackets, suits, blouses/shirts, sweaters/sweatshirts, dresses, tops/T-shirts, blazers, coats, lingerie, sportswear. Men thought that trying trousers (80.8%), jeans (68.9%) and suits (60.1%) was particularly important. Women chose trousers (77.5%), jeans (73.1%) and dresses (54.4%). The fourth choice for women was lingerie, at 41.0%.

 

 

The top three choices for both women and men were wardrobe basics and garments that are found in every fashion store. This further underlines the relevance of the fitting room. Blazers (23.5%), coats (21.5%) and sportswear (16.2%) are taken into the fitting room less frequently by both women and men.

 

 

Why do you go into the fitting room when trying on fashion garments?

Around 90% of respondents said they partly or fully agreed with the statement that people go into a fitting room to see whether a garment is the right size and what it looks like on. More than 95% of women gave that response. So the perfect look in the fitting room is an important buying criterion. Although the national average of people who take a selfie of a new outfit in the fitting room in Germany is only 15%, as many as 25% of 16 to 29 year olds do it.

 

 

The older the consumer, the less likely he or she is to take a selfie in the fitting room. 71.7% of the entire population get frustrated by poor fitting room conditions (e.g. too small, poor lighting . . .), and 40.2% actually leave the store without buying anything because they don’t like the fitting room.

 

What things annoy you most when you’re trying something on in the fitting room?

72.7% of respondents get most annoyed by the poor quality of lighting in some fitting rooms, and that reflects the opinion of over 78.7% of women. Poor lighting is actually a factor that annoys customers more than having no back view mirror (66.4%), no chair/seat (63.5%) and no freedom of movement (62.6%).

 

 

Respondents were less annoyed by screens, different lighting scenarios and direct pay options in the fitting room (when provided). It is clear that technical features in fitting rooms are more important to the younger target groups (16-29 and 30-39 age groups).

 

 

How important is a pleasantly-lit, bright fitting room to you?

85% of all respondents stated that a pleasantly-lit and bright fitting room is important (39.8%) or very important (45.2%). More than 90.2% of women said that these factors were important or very important.

 

 

How important are the following lighting-related aspects of a fitting room to you?

Respondents feel that the following lighting-related aspects are important or very important:

  • Suitable light intensity in the entire fitting room 83.8%
  • Excellent colour identification 71.2%
  • Glare-free light 70.2%

Only 15 to 20 percent of the people who selected the above top 3 believe that the following aspects are important, but new trends are evident. 36.7% of 30 to 39 year olds consider adjustable lighting (light scenarios) to be an important or very important way of checking how a garment looks for different occasions. 30% of the same target group thought that touchscreen controls (e.g. dimmer) and touchscreens with additional functions (e.g. display additional products) were important or very important.

 

 

Do you buy your clothes on the high street or online?

We know from many statistics that the online retail sector is expanding. According to EHI, it continued to expand in 2016. Brick-and-mortar retailers have to fight this trend by delivering a better and more emotional shopping experience to the customer at the store, and by creating suitable incentives.

 

Our survey revealed that the majority of respondents only make online purchases of clothing products up to a value of EUR 50. When they pay EUR 51 or more they tend to make their purchases from brick-and-mortar retail outlets. Increasing prices for clothing products are resulting in more and more consumers shopping on the high street. So the high street retailers have to make the consumer’s buying decision easier. 75% of the population who spend more than EUR 200 on clothing ignore the digital world and shop at real boutiques or department stores. And only one-fifth of consumers spending EUR 500 or more shop online.

 

 

Survey design

Basics:n = 1.041 Personen
Population-representative distributionby gender, age (16-69 years) and region (Nielsen areas).
Timeframe:24.1.–26.1.2017
Sociodemographic data:gender, age, educational background, occupation, gross household income, marital status, household size, children, region, federal state

 

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